Writing As 2020’s Next Therapy!

crop black man drawing on blackboard in light studio

 EVER HEAR OF EUSTRESS?

Eustress is a term that means “productive stress.” In other words, the “ride-at-your-own-risk” sign outside of a rollercoaster sure as sin draws you more to it than if it said: “ride but try to have fun.” That sign is not meant to deter you from the rollercoaster, but to add excitement! Vigor is defined as: “A productive response to stress.” Now why can we not experience this with writing? Writing is a cathartic experience for all. Even if you hate to pick up a pen, you may keep a journal or a vlog. This is a benefit. Writing is known to produce great cathartic effects, i.e., stress-relieving activity. When I write, as an example, even if not for a client, I find great pride knowing I got my feelings out; knowing I got my point across…these are some small yet concise examples of how writing can be ultimately therapeutic. Here’s why. However, do make note that this is not empirically proven.

THE NEUROLOGY OF WRITING

Catharsis is relief from stress. Some people cry their feelings out (which is equally productive); others work out (also, equally productive). However, many forget that self-expression is a great way to relieve your emotions. Plus, when you are done writing whatever it is you are focusing on, you will have more to show for your stress than, say, drinking your problems away. Catharsis is experienced when you relieve stress. Even studies on creative writing have found that not only does writing relieve stress. It also improves confidence and allows for eustress, as we spoke of earlier. When you write in, say, a journal, you are communicating with yourself, which is better than a therapist! The same goes for writing! When you write, you alleviate stress. When you write, you alleviate tension because on a neurological level. I plan to do a small research experiment on the brain activity of those who write creatively for stress-relieving effects. However, until that day comes, I have to speculate. Writing is therapeutic in nature. We were cavemen once, remember? Cavemen communicated in two ways: 1) with grunts, and 2) with communicating via caveman walls. Our baser instincts allow us to associate on a psychological level the ability to merely show rather than tell. Sure, a therapist might help, but what if you tried a short yet concise experiment? Try writing daily. You can keep a time tracker to document your feelings before, during and after your writing. See if over two weeks, writing a journal daily (even if you never publish it online) helps keep you in check. If it does, we have succeeded in our thesis.

JOURNALS WILL HELP A LOT

If you cannot think of anything to write about, consider a journal. Even vlogs (video blogs) can help. When we express our feelings (and especially when we do so publicly for acceptance and social approval), you are doing two things: 1) you are socializing. When you post a blog online, or write something that eventually finds its way into public eyes, you are doing what we are anthropologically meant to do: to communicate through visuals. What is writing? It is communication but visually. We have to go back to our routes in history to determine what is best for us. 2) You are gaining social proof, which is acceptance. If you cannot think of anything to write about, consider a journal. Even vlogs (video blogs) can help. When we express our feelings (and especially when we do so publicly for acceptance and social approval), you are doing two things: 1) you are socializing. When you post a blog online, or write something that eventually finds its way into public eyes, you are doing what we are anthropologically meant to do: to communicate through visuals. What is writing? It is communication but visually. We have to go back to our routes in history to determine what is best for us. 2) You are gaining social proof, which is acceptance. The human condition, unfortunately for those who hate being the center of attention, requires socialization. Let’s discuss social proof.

SOCIAL PROOF & WRITING

Social proof is a term that simply means: looking like you are an expert. When you see one of my blogs published, I am establishing social proof. Now, if 10,000 people read it, it is a success. If one person reads it, it is a success. Yes, it does not need to be read, but I suggest signing up for a blogging or vlogging platform and writing daily. You would be amazed how good you will feel when you vent your feelings. Putting them up publicly is your choice. One has to consider that some people do not enjoy doing that. However, writing is still cathartic and can relieve stress. I like to think a blog should outline your daily thoughts and emotions. If you cannot think of anything to write about, consider a journal. Even vlogs (video blogs) can help. When we express our feelings (and especially when we do so publicly for acceptance and social approval), you are doing two things: 1) you are socializing. When you post a blog online, or write something that eventually finds its way into public eyes, you are doing what we are anthropologically meant to do: to communicate through visuals. What is writing? It is communication but visually. We have to go back to our routes in history to determine what is best for us. 2) You are gaining social proof, which is acceptance.

TO CONCLUDE THIS BLOG

I wrote this and I feel better already…

 

Published by Ryan W. McClellan

Entrepreneur, Author & Business Consultant With A Background In Multimedia & Content Development

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